Use WONDERS20 at checkout - ENDS TODAY 23:59 GMT

Week of Wonders 20% off ends today!

Limited Time Only

How to Use Pink Colours in Your Home

Pretty in

Pink

From Homer’s rosy-fingered dawn to today’s feminist icon, pink has always been a provocative colour - perfect for statement-making interiors.

Pretty in

Pink

From Homer’s rosy-fingered dawn to today’s feminist icon, pink has always been a provocative colour - perfect for statement-making interiors.

Punk and Powerful

Named for the ruffled edges of the carnation, pink has gone through many transformations - at times a symbol of masculinity and status, hyper-femininity and innocence, romance and seduction, protest and punk. 

Punk and Powerful

Named for the ruffled edges of the carnation, pink has gone through many transformations - at times a symbol of masculinity and status, hyper-femininity and innocence, romance and seduction, protest and punk. 

Venus & Fire

In the Middle Ages, pink could be seen in women’s fashion and religious art. The colour came to represent motherly love, innocence and the body of Christ - a symbol of the ephemeral side of God. This was a revolution and a revelation - it humanised the heavens and ensured pink would go on to become the colour to blur boundaries. 

Later, pink was predominantly seen as a colour for boys because of its similarity to the red of military uniforms and only began to be associated with femininity in the mid 19th century. Reminiscent of Venus the goddess of love, pink became a symbol of womanhood - effeminate, delicate and soft. 

It has since become the colour of protest and awareness, of activism and power. A colour of contradiction, this hue allows you to revel in your rebellious spirit or invoke the soft romance of the rose. Embrace the power of pink.

Venus & Fire

In the Middle Ages, pink could be seen in women’s fashion and religious art. The colour came to represent motherly love, innocence and the body of Christ - a symbol of the ephemeral side of God. This was a revolution and a revelation - it humanised the heavens and ensured pink would go on to become the colour to blur boundaries. 

Later, pink was predominantly seen as a colour for boys because of its similarity to the red of military uniforms and only began to be associated with femininity in the mid 19th century. Reminiscent of Venus the goddess of love, pink became a symbol of womanhood - effeminate, delicate and soft. 

It has since become the colour of protest and awareness, of activism and power. A colour of contradiction, this hue allows you to revel in your rebellious spirit or invoke the soft romance of the rose. Embrace the power of pink.

At Home with Pink

Proven to instil calmness and positivity, pink can work in any space. Pink’s warmth and richness of tone evokes an inviting intimacy, perfect for living rooms and bedrooms - coat all walls in this versatile shade to create a comforting cocooning effect. Complement pink’s subtleties with neutrals or bring out its playfulness with reds, yellows and pattern. Be pretty in pink with this nurturing hue - pink has a subtle radiating glow which is flattering on all skin tones, making it a great colour to use in bathrooms and dressing areas. For those looking for just a touch of colour, bring some romance to your scheme with accents and accessories in the delicate tones of ‘Dusky Pink’ and ‘Blush’ or be pretty in punk with the vivacious vibrancy of ‘Amaranth’. Welcome to a new wave of pink. 

The Alchemy of Pink

Described by Roman poets as ‘roseus’, the colour pink has existed throughout history, but it wasn’t until the 17th century that it was even given a name. Early pink pigment was called kermes and was made from crushed insects. Prized by Medieval painters, kermes was used to colour textiles, to decorate manuscript illuminations and its delicate tones appeared in Early Renaissance religious paintings. Used since ancient times by the Aztec people, carmine was another insect derived pigment and was brought to Europe in the 16th century. Plants and roots were the more widely used source of pink. From the 12th to the 15th centuries, pigment was derived from brazilwood, although the colour did not last. Following this, Madder became the predominant source of pink - 30 times cheaper than pigment made from insects and with longevity and vibrant colour, it is still used today.

Here to Help

Whether you want to coat all four walls with wonder or need advice on how to introduce the harmonious hues of nature into your space, we are here for you. With a decade of experience, our in-house experts are ready to help you with everything from colour matching to creating your dream interior - no space is too small or project too big. 

For more information or to book your complimentary Design Consultation, simply follow the link below, and get ready to immerse yourself in the art of nature. 

At Home with Pink

Proven to instil calmness and positivity, pink can work in any space. Pink’s warmth and richness of tone evokes an inviting intimacy, perfect for living rooms and bedrooms - coat all walls in this versatile shade to create a comforting cocooning effect. Complement pink’s subtleties with neutrals or bring out its playfulness with reds, yellows and pattern. Be pretty in pink with this nurturing hue - pink has a subtle radiating glow which is flattering on all skin tones, making it a great colour to use in bathrooms and dressing areas. For those looking for just a touch of colour, bring some romance to your scheme with accents and accessories in the delicate tones of ‘Dusky Pink’ and ‘Blush’ or be pretty in punk with the vivacious vibrancy of ‘Amaranth’. Welcome to a new wave of pink. 

The Alchemy of Pink

Described by Roman poets as ‘roseus’, the colour pink has existed throughout history, but it wasn’t until the 17th century that it was even given a name. Early pink pigment was called kermes and was made from crushed insects. Prized by Medieval painters, kermes was used to colour textiles, to decorate manuscript illuminations and its delicate tones appeared in Early Renaissance religious paintings. Used since ancient times by the Aztec people, carmine was another insect derived pigment and was brought to Europe in the 16th century. Plants and roots were the more widely used source of pink. From the 12th to the 15th centuries, pigment was derived from brazilwood, although the colour did not last. Following this, Madder became the predominant source of pink - 30 times cheaper than pigment made from insects and with longevity and vibrant colour, it is still used today.

Here to Help

Whether you want to coat all four walls with wonder or need advice on how to introduce the harmonious hues of nature into your space, we are here for you. With a decade of experience, our in-house experts are ready to help you with everything from colour matching to creating your dream interior - no space is too small or project too big. ‌For more information or to book your complimentary Design Consultation, simply follow the link below, and get ready to immerse yourself in the art of nature.